Female Air France Attendants Refuse To Wear Hijab On Flights To Iran

Female Air France attendants are rightfully upset over being asked to wear Islamic headscarves (hijabs) when flights between France and Iran resume later this month (apparently, the service has been suspended for the last eight years).

Via the National Post:

The resumption of a thrice-weekly service between Paris and Tehran, planned for April 17 after an eight-year break, follows a thaw in relations since Iran agreed to dismantle large sections of its nuclear programme.

Iranian women have been forced by law to cover their hair or face stiff fines or even imprisonment since 1979.

In staunchly secular France, however, public signs of religion have been frowned upon since a 1905 law separated church and state.

French women see Islamic headscarves and veils as an affront to their dignity. They are banned in state schools and offices, and it is illegal to wear the full-face veil in public.

Nothing like asking women to oppress themselves in the 21st century, eh?

Female Air France Attendants Refuse To Wear Hijab On Flights To Iran

Putting Her In Her Place: How Men Engage In Targeted Harassment Online

I blocked someone on Twitter last night.

I hate doing it — it feels like a violation of my principles — but more and more lately, I’ve come to understand there’s a difference between someone challenging my opinion or hurling a few insults at me and targeted, calculated harassment. The former is par for the course when you voice your thoughts on the internet, but the latter is a phenomenon that, in my experience, is perpetrated exclusively by men with the explicit purpose of asserting themselves over me as a woman.

So, when my phone buzzed a few days ago with several notifications in a row after I’d responded to someone with two short comments on my Facebook page, I made the decision to ignore the individual on the basis that his behaviour indicated it was not worth the back-and-forth. One day later, after some silence, I received a notification on Twitter from the same person, who had now gone out of his way to create an account just to continue ranting at me. I gave him the opportunity to stop by threatening to mute his account, and for a few hours, he did. Then I received another tweet, so I replied appropriately and blocked him.

Read the full article at The Libertarian Republic.

Putting Her In Her Place: How Men Engage In Targeted Harassment Online